Global E-waste Monitor 2020

Global E-waste Monitor 2020 | UPSC

      HEADLINES:

E-waste to increase 38% by 2030: Report

      WHY IN NEWS:

Most electronic waste around the world still not being collected and recycled properly: United Nations University

SYLLABUS COVERED: GS 3:REPORTS

      LEARNING: 

For PRELIMS you have to look out for greatest and smallest here . Remember the publisher .

For MAINS note down the toxic elements and the effects on human health.

      ISSUE: 

Global e-waste — discarded electrical and electronic equipment — will increase by 38 per cent in the decade between 2020 and 2030, according to a new United Nations University (UNU) report.  

GLOBAL E-WASTE MONITOR 2020

PUBLISHED BY

The Global E-waste Monitor 2020  is a collaborative product of the

  • Global E-waste Statistics Partnership (GESP), formed by the United Nations University (UNU).
  • International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
  • International Solid Waste Association (ISWA).
  • UN Environment Programme (UNEP).

Global E-waste Monitor 2020

There was 53.6 million tonnes of electronic waste in 2019, according to a new United Nations University report. Photo: Flickr There was 53.6 million tonnes of electronic waste in 2019.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  There was 53.6 million tonnes (MT) e-waste in 2019.

  • That is a nearly 21 per cent increase in just five years.

VOLUME GENERATED

  • Asia generated the greatest volume of e-waste in 2019 — some 24.9 MT.
  • Followed by the Americas (13.1 MT) and Europe (12 MT).
  • Africa and Oceania generated 2.9 MT and 0.7 MT respectively.

E-WASTE TYPES

  • Most E-waste in 2019 consisted of small equipment (17.4 MT),large equipment (13.1 MT) and temperature exchange equipment (10.8 MT).
  • Screens and monitors, lamps, small IT and telecommunication equipment represented 6.7 MT, 4.7 MT, and 0.9 M respectively.

E-waste is a health and environmental hazard, containing toxic additives or hazardous substances such as mercury, which damages the human brain and / or coordination system.

 RECYCLING

  • Less than 18 per cent of the e-waste generated in 2019 was collected and recycled.
  • This means that e-waste consisting gold, silver, copper, platinum and other high-value, recoverable materials worth at least $57 billion was mostly dumped or burned rather than being collected for treatment and reuse.

LEGISLATION

  • The number of countries that have adopted a national e-waste policy, legislation or regulation has increased from 61 to 78 and includes India.
  • It is far from the target set by the International Telecommunication Union to raise the percentage of countries with an e-waste legislation to 50 per cent.

There are 312 authorised recyclers of e-waste in India, with the capacity for treating approximately 800 kilotonnes annually.

      IASbhai WINDUP: 

  • However, formal recycling capacity remains under utilised, as the large majority of the waste is still handled by the informal sector.

  About 90 per cent of the country’s e-waste is recycled in the informal sector.

  • Hence, effective implementation of regulations is the way ahead to managing the e-waste that is yet to be regulated in at least 115 countries.
SUGGESTED READING : www.globalewaste.org 
     SOURCES:DOWNTOEARTH | Global E-waste Monitor 2020 | UPSC

 

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